HOW TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR HAIR UNDERNEATH A WEAVE PT.2

Hello Naturalista’s,

This is the Part 2 of 2, of How to Take Care of Your Hair Underneath A Weave. In the last article we discussed about how to make sure you blend your natural hair with the weave or finding the right texture for your hair. In this article we are going to let the article title, live up to its name, this is the real article on HOW TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR HAIR UNDERNEATH A WEAVE.

Let’s Go:

“The basic idea of hair care with a weave is to stick as close to your normal regimen as possible while making an effort to prevent build up. That means your normal wash day applies as do your normal moisturizing duties.

The most important thing to remember when washing your hair with a weave is to dilute all your products. This is where an applicator bottle becomes invaluable. They are dirt cheap, you can pick them up from most beauty stores and they make your wash day so much simpler! Essentially you mix a small amount of your shampoo with plenty of water. You want to end up with a pretty runny mixture that you can easily get on your scalp and hair underneath.”

MASSAGE THE SCALP GENTLY! ~ RONNIE R. -Naturalology,

When you are washing your hair, please remember, to gently massage the scalp to reduce any frizz or harsh friction. Remember that you have a sew-in/glue-in, whatever, you do not want to massage to vigorously to cause any unnecessary breakage and damage.

After washing and gently massaging the scalp. Remove the shampoo:water mixture from the spray/applicator bottle and fill with plain ‘ole H2o (water). Add the water to the scalp as much as needed, but not too much, to rinse out the shampoo.

Remove access water with a old cotton t-shirt. Why? This is not going to cause frizz like a heavy towel or wash cloth would. So do the t-shirt method to be safe.

CONDITION, CONDITION, CONDITION! ~ Ronnie R. – Naturalology

What about conditioning you may ask? Well, conditioning is done the same way. My suggestion is that you find the perfect ratio that works for you. A lot of people give certain ratios but remember a 50:50 conditioner/water ratio, may be in actuality, a 80:20 conditioner/water ratio for you. (That was a figure of speech by the way!) So once you figure out your ratio, repeat the same steps as for the shampoo.

Oils & Silicones While Wearing A Weave

Oils are great for sealing and silicone’s help give some of your favorite conditioners that addictive slip but here’s the catch. Both these are the largest contributors to build up!

“If you have worn braids or cornrows for any length of time then you will be familiar with that whitish, gunky stuff that resides at the base of the braid after a few weeks of wearing them. The build up happens when a combination of sebum and product build up collects at the base of the braid allowing fibers and lint to also get stuck.

Not only is this gunk gross to wash out but it is one of the biggest contributors to broken hair after taking out a protective style. If you are natural, you may also see an increase in knots and tangles from shed hairs getting stuck in the gluey sebum residue. Not cute.

My battle plan when I have worn weaves in the past is to increase the frequency of moisturizing or to use a humectant like glycerin in my braid sprays to attract moisture from the atmosphere and keep my hair soft. If you think about it, wearing a weave is like wearing a hat 24/7 so you will find that your hair will retain moisture better anyway as it is not exposed to the environment as much.

I generally don’t use any oils on my hair while wearing weaves. Having said that, some ladies have had success in using some natural oils or even hair growth boosting oils during protective styling so I will leave it up to you to decide what is best for your hair and scalp.” ~ Alma, blackhairinfomation

Moisturizing Your Hair Underneath A Weave

This step should be the easiest to you. Because, as a African American woman, our hair has to be moisturized. That goes for anyone whether you are relaxed, texlaxed, natural, unnatural, whatever, you get the point, right?

Keep the hair moisturized, PERIOD!

“When you are moisturizing, try to go for a liquid leave-in conditioner. A list of liquid leave in’s are below. This is much better than the obvious selection over the creamy leave in’s which will lead to buildup.

These are just a few. For more listings go to www.curlmart.com

If you are a natural, then you might want to take a look at either of these two videos, if you are relaxed, then look just a little further down!

or watch Jenelle Steward

Post Washing Weave Hair Care

How you style your hair after your wash will of course depend on the texture that you have chosen for your weave. Relaxed ladies can roller set the leave out hair as well as the extensions for a straight style. Naturals can do a braid out, twist out or flexi rod set on the hair left out in order to blend with the curly weave. It’s probably best to do your wash routine at night to allow your leave out hair to dry completely before unraveling in the morning.

You can spritz your moisturizer or braid spray on your hair underneath every other day or as needed to keep your hair’s moisture balance in check. A word of warning: Whether you are relaxed or natural I should stress that you must absolutely allow your hair underneath the weave to dry completely before you got to bed. Even if you have to use a hair dryer on medium heat to dry your roots then please do so.

Leaving your hair wet for prolonged periods will increase the likelihood of getting a fungal scalp infection which could stunt your hair’s growth and defeating the purpose of the protective style.

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